Worthy Praise

CCflickr shared by Avard Woolaver

Some of us are better at recognizing our own gifts and talents more than others.  Most people, if pressed, could list two or three of their own talents.  Usually they are obvious ones; personal skills or expertise that has contributed to our career, or positive personality traits we have developed.

What might not be obvious are the gifts you have that impact other’s lives.  Just like those around us may not be aware of the gifts we feel they have.  Humans can be slow to praise and general in our thanks.

The people we work alongside, those we run into day-to-day, probably have no idea that we appreciate them or recognize their contribution and hard work.  I was involved in a virtual chat with health leaders/practitioners across the globe (although mostly North American) and we were tossing around what the essential qualities were for showing appreciation and thankfulness.  Some of the prevailing thoughts were that praise should be:

  • Genuine:  Praise that is not genuine feels contrived.  If you don’t actually recognize the value of and appreciate the person, don’t say it.  This involves some reflection on our part, as everyone has value and talents.
  • Specific:  One of the most meaningful compliments I ever received was being told that I put people at ease, help them feel  comfortable.  That’s specific, and something I didn’t know. Referencing a specific incident or particular skill is valuable when offering praise.  It shows you recognize specific qualities and often encourages personal growth for the person being praised.
  • Generous Praise to colleagues, staff and friends should come with no strings attached, no “to-do” list at the end.  It should just be what it is, an acknowledgment of hard work, contribution, or talent.
  • Personal  What came up over and again is that praise which is personal means more.  Praising colleagues or staff publicly in newsletters, staff meetings, in posts online, all are important.  But so is the handwritten note, or the phone call or the one-on-one thanks.

We all need to feel acknowledged and appreciated.  Remembering to show gratitude or praising our colleagues and staff is an important part of team and community building.

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